Stop Saying Thank You on Social Media & Say Something Meaningful!


Thank You

Do you find yourself saying thanks a lot on social media? Ever thought WHY you do that?

In this article I am going to tell you to stop thanking people. Have I gone mad? I’ll tell you why…


I’ve been blogging for over two years now and it’s encouraging to see a lot of people sharing my articles. Some of these people share straight from my blog using one of the social networking share buttons, or from my RSS news feed in Feedly or perhaps on the blogging network, Triberr. I am extremely grateful to these people and I do try and respond to as many of the people who share my articles to say thank you.

But why?

Why do I say thank you on Twitter? A strange question, you ask?

No Thanks!

Thanks TweetsBeing encouraging is part of my nature and I value politeness very highly. I always say please and thank you in real life, so surely it’s the same on social media?

Well, kind of…

The thing is, sometimes a “thank you” can lose its value in the noise and sheer volume of posts.

Do you find yourself replying, sending a direct message or commenting with the following?

  1. “Thanks for following me. Looking forward to reading your tweets!”
  2. “Thanks for sharing :-)”
  3. “Thanks for the awesome RTs”

All of the above examples are very polite and encouraging, but what do they actually mean? Have you thought about the meaning of your “thank you” messages or are you just doing what every one else is doing?

Don’t get me wrong, I am doing exactly the same- but recently I was made to think about whether all this thanking was doing any good. I have marketing consultant, Mark Schaefer to thank for that. Thanks, Mark… (oops…!)

It was one of Mark’s blog posts entitled “Why I Stopped Thanking People on the Social web” that made me stop and think.  Do read it- it will give you an idea of what I am referring to.

In the article, Mark says that the tipping point came when someone tweeted him:

You are too damn polite… Stop thanking people, will you!

Ouch.

Mark then went on to say…

I knew he had a point. I had reached the thank you tipping point. So I stopped.

This saddened me. I hate it that the more popular you become on the social web, the less engaging you can be. Isn’t that ironic? The very characteristic people appreciate is doomed over time. Authentic social media engagement is not scalable.

I think Mark makes an interesting point.  Social media is about creating meaningful content or building meaningful relationships- and that includes replies.

It’s also about knowing who is in your core community and knowing why people are sharing your content in the first place.


Translating Thanks

dictionaries
Photo Credit: Tim Green aka atoach via Compfight cc

So, coming back to the above example “thank you” messages, let’s do a bit of translating. Could it be that the above messages could mean the following?….

  1. “Thanks for for following me. Looking forward to reading your tweets!”
    TRANSLATION: This is an automated message because I am too busy to send you a hand-crafted one. I might be interested in reading what you say although to be honest I probably don’t have that much time to read any of them. I was hoping to reach 10,000 followers, and I’m almost there. Basically I have no idea why I am tweeting you to say thank you for following me, but it seems like the polite thing to do….
  2. “Thanks for sharing :-)”
    TRANSLATION: I am genuinely thankful that you shared my article, however I don’t have the time to properly engage with you, but I wanted to say thanks because that’s the right thing to do- my mummy/mommy & daddy taught me to be polite.
  3. “Thanks for the awesome RTs”
    TRANSLATION: Thanks for retweeting some of my tweets to your followers. I haven’t thought about it, but come to think about it, some of your followers may have seen my tweets in their timelines. That’s quite good really and it gives me a bit of exposure. Please do keep on doing it! I don’t really talk to you much on Twitter, but I do like the fact that you’re doing my marketing for me.

OK, please note that I had my tongue firmly in my cheek with the above, but I hope you got my point!


Taking up the Opportunity

Opportunity CenterPart of the issue that Mark Schaefer was referring to, was the lack of value of a “thanks for sharing” type of reply. It’s not quite meaningless, but once you start sending out dozens of these a day, they are going to lose their value.

How about doing something a little different?

Instead of just thanking them, why not introduce them to someone else they might find interesting? How about reading one of their articles and giving some feedback? You won’t necessarily be able to do that with all your replies, but you could create an opportunity and build upon the relationship.

Photo Credit: MikeLove via Compfight cc

Be Encouraging!

friendship
Photo Credit: eflon via Compfight cc

We’ve missed something though and it is a biggy…

Encouragement.

Most of us like to be encouraged. If we don’t get any feedback it can be a bit depressing. Words of Affirmation is one of the 5 Love Languages (read the book if you haven’t already). Each of us accept and give love and attention in different ways, but one that works well on the social web is Words of Affirmation– encouragement.

I love it when someone leaves a comment on my articles, but the truth is that most readers of blogs don’t.

Talk to most bloggers out there, and they’ll tell you the same- they wish they had more comments. The same goes for Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook. It’s great when someone replies, mentions us or leaves a comment.

However which would you prefer- 20 “thank you for your article” one line comments or 5 longer comments where they share their thoughts? We need to be encouraging but also add value to the conversation. That’s how it is in real life, so why should it be any different online?


“Thanks” Replacement Ideas List

So what should we do instead? I’m not saying we should never just say thank you, but in most cases you should always be looking to make your engagement more meaningful.

So here is my “thank you” Replacement List.

  1. Ask them what they think
    Ask them what they thought of one aspect of the article. If your article was a list of tools or services, ask them what their favourite was. They may not have read the article, but your tweet may quickly remedy that!
  2. Let then know what you think
    If they have a website or blog, have a visit and read an article. Reply to let them know you’ve visited with some thoughts.
  3. Introduce them to someone new
    If you’ve not engaged with them before, check their profile. If relevant, you could introduce them to someone else in your core community they may find interesting. Being in touch with your community is important.
  4. Share a relevant article
    If relevant, share a similar article that you have written
  5. Ask them to subscribe
    Recommend they subscribe to your blog or email newsletter. Use Twitter Lead Generation Cards
  6. Be funny
    Tell a joke or share something funny- make their day!
  7. Encourage them
    Encourage them by sharing with them something you like or admire about them or a quality you see in them.

Using Commun.it to help you

“That’s all very well”, you say, “but I don’t have enough time!”.

I  understand- I have the same issue. However that’s why spending time thanking everyone without a strategy isn’t going to help you!

Firstly, make your own “thank you” replacement list and save it somewhere where you can easily access it. In order to make things easier, we are going to use a tool called Commun.it* which is a  Twitter Relationship Management Tool. You can quickly respond to people who have shared your content. Commun.it segments people into influencers, supporters and engaged members. For more information see my Complete Guide on Using Commun.it.

communit

With your “thank you replacement” list to hand, you can quickly go through your pending replies and mentions and actually engage much more meaningfully with the core people in your community. You may discover people who you haven’t engaged with before- people who you didn’t realise were in your community. This is the power of Commun.it.

Commun.it ScreenshotThe best way is to go through the different feeds in Commun.it- one at a time. However, remember to plan!

I’d recommend using the prioritized feed as well as consider to reply and high value members. As well as that, make sure you monitor tweets containing links to your blog posts- if you do this you can quickly go through the monitoring feed too.

Here are the feeds in Commun.it:

  • PRIORITIZED FEED (the most important pending mentions and people for you to action)
  • FOLLOWERS (consider to reply, re-engage, to follow, unfollow, new followers & new unfollowers)
  • RELATIONSHIPS (high value members, influencers, Supporters & engaged members)
  • MONITORING (people tweeting posts containing your keywords or links)
  • LEADS (potential people to follow relating to certain keywords)

Use Twitter Lead Generation Cards

Twitter Lead Generation CardYou may have noticed that I included “Twitter Lead Generation Cards” above. If you haven’t heard of them, don’t worry. Twitter Lead Generation Cards allow you to give someone the option for signing up for a newsletter, an event, a product launch or more. It’s really awesome, and I’ve written about it in my article – Boost your Mailing List with Twitter’s Lead Generation Cards. In the article I explain how I’m using them to let people sign up to my email newsletter using MailChimp as well as adding them to my CRM (Customer Relationship Management tool) Nimble.


What do you think?

So, have I got you thinking? Do you agree or disagree? Do you have a plan or strategy in how you engage with people using social media? I’d love to know. As always, please leave your comment below (even if it is a “thank you for your article!” comment!)

 


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About Ian Anderson Gray

Ian is a speaker, coach, social media consultant, web developer & Partner of Select Performers. In real life he is a husband, dad and geek and is rather partial to tea, coffee & Indian cooking. Find out more



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129 Comments on "Stop Saying Thank You on Social Media & Say Something Meaningful!"

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Chris Moore
Guest
17 days 54 minutes ago

I don’t disagree with the great Mark Schaefer on much but on this one I do. While I accept that there has to be an intention to promote further conversation and trust, a simple “thank you” is never a bad thing. I thank new followers, people who have shared my content and re-tweeted my stuff, those who have commented or engaged with me in some other way. I do it in a personal way, not a copy and paste way.

When I advise businesses on improving their customer service saying “thank you” forms the backbone. I look upon it as a simple act that builds goodwill, I give the analogy of paying in to a sort of goodwill account, when something goes awry and a customer needs to be placated or helped out you can draw on that goodwill account to not only solve a situation but as importantly, not lose a customer.

It’s all of the above and you know what, it’s just a nice thing to do.

Ray Berard
Guest
1 month 20 days ago
A response to the distance past. Although this was written almost three years ago I find it still relevant today. I just wish I had seen it back then. Currently my social media voice is predominately on Twitter although I am somewhat on Snapchat, Periscope, Busker, Anchor and Facebook. However I do not have a blog basically because I really don’t have anything to write about. I have been on Twitter since its inception but not really active until the latter part of last year. I too was looking for engagement and needed a way to say TY without appearing as a one liner like everyone else. So I searched for an idea that would make that happen and EmojiNote was created. And although I am having a blast with it I am finding myself doing the same as before but with an image doing my talking. But the one thing I don’t want to do is automate the process. Each and every EmojiNote is created individually and I review every tweet I reply to. A lot of them I even have to dig a bit to find a name because it is that important to me to add to… Read more »
Ammar Ali
Guest
1 month 20 days ago

Hey Ian,

When someone share content from my blog. I do say “thank you” but along with that I also ask if they find the content helpful and what’s the next post they want to see on my blog.

Isn’t that cool? 😉

Sarah Jones
Member
3 months 18 days ago

yes, Yes, and oh wow, COOL. Translation: I’m so very glad that I found this article AND i look forward to reading the email you sent me at the beginning. I believe in the power of communication and the basic “manners” that I grew up with. I absolutely want to send every follower a note saying Thank You, but it does start to feel like I am cutting cookies. I loved your content, suggestions and sense of humor throughout! And then the tools at the end are inspiring and COOL 🙂 thank you again. Sooo, If you have had a manic Monday and you have felt Discouraged at all, DON’T. You just motivated and helped a little fish down here 🙂

If you happen to have any suggestions in the arena of nutrition and wellness, I included website at end.
Twitter: @gustinegoose

Segundo
Guest
4 months 2 days ago

That is so true. I really don’t like it when they keep saying thanks. Engaging with them is the best options. Keeps them interested.

James
Guest
4 months 12 days ago

Nice Reading ! Thank You 🙂

Bruno
Member
4 months 23 days ago

nice reading! And this ar just a few NO”s that people tend to do online, just like “im sorry” on “excuse me” on unnecessary situations.
Great tips posted on this article

TourWizard
Member
6 months 1 day ago

This is a great article! I agree with the list of things you should NOT say but I have a little comment to make about asking your visitors to subscribe. I think that this should come naturally, otherwise you might end up looking spamy.

Gloria
Guest
6 months 1 day ago
First Ian, let me say that you were a “Divine Find” today, and I do appreciate all that you do! I was just sitting here having a conversation with my husband, and telling him I don’t completely understand the use of the “Mute” button because I’m just learning how to engage with Twitter. I started using Twitter, other social media, attempting to set up of a website, and writing because, unfortunately, I have been ill for several months, and I was to serve. Before becoming ill, that was my life – “Encouraging” – Not being able to fulfill a passion can be very devastating, and depressing. Finally, I have enough energy to at least write, even though at times it can be very challenging. Whenever there is a new follower, I do not just thank them, I visit their page, read their profile, try to get insight on who they might be. Yes it is time consuming, but being home ill, I have nothing but time. (when not sleeping). I love sharing encouraging comments along with the “Thank you”. I DM every single new follow, and believe me they are increasing quickly. Being superficial is very uncomfortable to me, so… Read more »
Vern
Guest
Vern
6 months 22 days ago

I like saying “THANK YOU”.

Sneshka
Guest
6 months 26 days ago

Ok, instead of just sharing this, comment too 😉
Your advice is really valuable, thank you….LOL, and to Mark. Can’t leave him out, can we.
I found myself posting thank you notes with images I track down that express my gratitude for the follows, retweets, etc., but only more recently. While it was feasible time wise, I actually tried some of what you suggest and have read their blogs/articles, left comments or shared them, followed them on other social media too. Much of the advice I come across online can be contradictory too, so I choose to follow my own insticts on this one: bright thank you notes and then engage more, depending on the individual. Still, I loved the read and a bunch of good advice that can be implemented in practice.

simon
Guest
7 months 22 days ago

Excellent tips. This is very informative!

Sue
Guest
Sue
9 months 16 days ago

I’d like to see a shift in expectation on social media. If a ‘like’ were to be understood as an acknowledgement with thanks, we could use the comments simply to make useful or interesting points in reply. So much time saved! So many fewer interesting comments lost in a sea of meaningless thanks!

Karina
Member
10 months 10 days ago

Hi Ian,
I surely enjoyed your article. I totally agree with you. In my opinion, being part of this fast paced online world we sometimes don’t take the time to truly engage with others and value what they write. Your article is a good guide to start saying thank you in different ways and how to accomplish that very efficiently with the awesome twitter tools. I will start implementing your tips, because I want to show appreciation to my twitter followers!
Cheers,
Karina Taugwalder

Indy
Guest
10 months 11 days ago

Great points – thanks for sharing! I still thank new Follows and people who RT and Favorite my tweets because I’m fairly new and still growing my audience on Twitter. But I’m already starting to see how time consuming it can be. I recently decided that whenever I Follow back a new Follower, I’ll go to their page and find something I like and I RT or Favorite. I put these in Buffer so they are spaced out over the day and don’t go out all at once. If I can’t find anything on someone’s page, then I don’t have anything in common and probably shouldn’t be Following them. Sure it takes a little time to do this. But I’ve discovered it allows me to get to the know my new Followers a bit AND it gives me a rich source of material to RT to my other Followers, without a lot of searching through the Twitter newsfeed. This interaction has allowed me to meet some really cool people and we’ve gone on to connect via other social media venues. And…Thanks Again, Ian!

Rachel
Member
10 months 12 days ago

Ian, I have been thinking the same thing for a while now. Social media gives us so many opportunities to connect yet I find that regularly we use it to superficially communicate with small talk and pleasantries (eg. facebook) or sometimes just randomly post with no intention of creating something further such as comments or a conversation (eg. twitter/pinterest). We are missing out if we leave it at cat pictures and funny memes. Although those are fun in moderation, we need to take hold of the opportunity to truly discuss and collaborate! I love the idea of joining the conversation and I hope more will follow suit. Thanks for the intriguing post.

arthur brogard
Guest
arthur brogard
10 months 19 days ago

rubbish. written for the sake of writing something. that’s what we’re inundated by – millions of people who feel duty bound to write something, anything, post half witted uninformed unintelligent comments pontifications on anything at all.

Shana
Guest
10 months 20 days ago

Lol. Nice piece Ian. I do like to appreciate people and be appreciated too, I mean who doesn’t right? I do however agree that it’s overdone at times. Moderation is key, I guess.

Susan j Schrader
Guest
10 months 20 days ago

Good article – thanks for writing it! Ha! Today I had someone on Twitter tell me bluntly to Stop Thanking People. That’s after they fav and rt my stuff. I’m not sure what to do now…:/
s.

Paula
Guest
Paula
10 months 24 days ago

From today I’m stop saying thank you for sharing on social media! I almost did it 10 minutes ago, but fortunately I found your post and I even left you a comment. So I took a lesson. Thanks! 🙂

Paul adams
Guest
Paul adams
10 months 27 days ago

New at Twitter, use it as political support for a candidate. can’t seem to get a grasp on how it works, have gotten 20 followers and can’t seem to keep up on my timeline especially the public ones. some people have thousands of followers, couldn’t imagine how to keep up with that? get confused about tweet ,retweet ,quote tweet, which one has the most exposure, should you tweet and retweet or would that be repetitious, and what’s edicate for people that follow, favor ,or retweet your tweet, which brought me to your article.
Thanks Paul.

Lloyd
Guest
11 months 6 days ago

Well this is a knock down, slap and kick in the can! I thought I was going to be spending a whole lot of extra time embedding those two words into my brain over a strong cup of coffee.

It’s this way. I’m just in the process of using Facebook for one of my pages and recently did a promotion on that page. It grew to 72 likes. It’s not anywhere near what a celebrity may have but enough to keep one busy typing Thank You for a bit. I had been searching for what would be a right response to each. Let say, if only I found your page before the many others I came across I wouldn’t be so charged up on coffee.

Bottom line, just one more Thank you for a big enlightenment and a different approach to my situation. Yep, added some extra words in there.

Addie
Guest
11 months 19 days ago

I just scrolled down the comment box and realized this article was published way back in 2013. I don’t know how but that completely escaped my eye earlier. However I’ve honestly come to admire you now. Most of the blogposts I’ve come across have replies from the writer to just the first couple of comments but you had replied to each and every one of them and dare I say with a simple thank you. I’m gonna do the same for my blog too. Well whenever I muster up the courage to finally post something.
But I do hope you would find the time to reply to my comment just like you did to all the others.

Addie
Guest
11 months 19 days ago

Sir, i absolutely loved your article and am currently heeding your own advice. However i ended up here looking for something entirely different. I wonder if you could help me with that please.
Most (or at least Many) of us thank people for following us on social media and almost 90% of the times get ignored but when a total stranger does reply to the thank you message, it obviously displays some interest to talk more or could simply mean courtesy. Whatever the case though, how to keep the conversation going after the initial thankyou/welcomes are over?

Christine
Guest
1 year 6 days ago

I would say “thanks”, but given the context…:) no, I really appreciate your replacement list. I’m new to Twitter and I’ve been mystified by the streams of “thank you’s”. On a related note regarding Twitter etiquette, I’d love to hear your take on the follow back/don’t follow back issue?

Rani Motilal
Guest
1 year 27 days ago

I totally agree with you! Great conversing with intelligence. Social networking and I don’t see eye to eye. I think Google has become my best friend thou. Amazingly I am the one always complaining about facebook and blackberry..they always seem to be confusing unlike Google.. Says it as it is! Also doing other networks job!

Well this is so unlike me saying thank you! Google has been tremendously of super help and I believe that it does not cost anything to say “thank you”.. Especially when I had to work day and night on my device getting rid of all the hackers and trying to locate GOOGLE! Was so relieved when I did thou!

Also all your motivational healing sites helped me become the positive person I am now!

ThisIsShe
Guest
ThisIsShe
1 year 2 months ago

Life saver. I have been on social media for a while, but I have recently decided to get serious about becoming a vlogger or podcaster. So, I wanted to know how to best build an audience and engage with followers while maintaining some personalization. Your list helped a lot, especially #1 Ask them what they think. I was getting so tired of saying thank you. I am writing notes and putting into practice now. 🙂

Kelly Sayce
Guest
1 year 2 months ago

Love this article! As a Canadian, saying “thank you” is in my DNA, however I have been struggling with how to express gratitude towards a new Twitter connection without it feeling robotic. I also have a hard time when I visit someone’s feed and the content/perspective/quality of the tweets gets lost amongst a sea of thank yous. Lately, I have been more passively expressing thanks by engaging on my new follower’s feeds, primarily by retweeting or favouriting posts. However your recommended Replacement List has taken things to a whole other level – a wonderful resource that I look forward to putting into practice today!

erika woolf
Guest
1 year 2 months ago

Great information – I was just about to post a couple of “thank you’s” and they didn’t feel right. I wanted something more. My Google search turned up your blog – THANK YOU! 😉

Seda Ucak
Guest
Seda Ucak
1 year 2 months ago

Very useful article. A good way to say thank you is also to send a meaningful picture. Please ensure you have the rights on the photo you post, or do mention the photographer.

CJ Andrew
Guest
CJ Andrew
1 year 3 months ago

Ian. Great post. Great blog. Plenty of food for thought here. I actually found this post, because I just hit the 100 twitter follower milestone that I set myself, and wondered about all the “thank yous”. Your post has put things in perspective, thanks (..oops!).

Btw: I quite like the way your blog is laid out; the fonts, the sections; all make for easy reading. I say this because this post is more or less “long-form” in length, yet it doesn’t feel that way. Mostly because the writing is really good, but also because of the way that the content is formatted and presented.

On some other long form posts, one loses the will to read after the first 700 words or so. In the case of this post, I actually looked forward to each section as it came up. Plenty of takeaways for me from this one post, as you can see. Kudos!

Jeff Gold Music
Guest
1 year 3 months ago

Hi Ian, I’ve just started really using twitter, I appreciate your insight (and wanted to thank you)….I was just looking into thanking my new followers with an automated response…I am a musician, and I was thinking of sending out a link for a free download for one of my songs to all new followers (which also puts them on my email list)….any thoughts?

La
Guest
La
1 year 3 months ago

Thank you

Ishika Alani
Guest
1 year 3 months ago

I found this Article on 1st position in Google Search. Very Meaningful 🙂 Loved it

Sarah Margaret Smith
Guest
Sarah Margaret Smith
1 year 3 months ago

Would you say that the idea is to treat followers, fans, customers, etc., more as individuals instead of giving everyone the same standardized reply? It seems to me that the sentiment behind the thank you is fine – showing gratitude when someone follows you is the right thing to do. However, when we just keep sending the same “thanks for following” message to everybody, it starts to look canned and inauthentic. Instead, perhaps we should develop a new habit of “thanking” people in a way that acknowledges their unique interests and shows that we actually want to engage them as a person and not treat them just like another number on our analytics dashboard.

Ventain
Guest
1 year 4 months ago

Thank you for your thoughts on ‘Thank you’

Lynchpin Proofreading
Guest
1 year 5 months ago

I agree with you. Although I appreciate people saying thank you, adding value is important. Great article!

Theo J Ellis
Guest
1 year 6 months ago

Yes, it has got me thinking! And that’s a good thing. The message here is to change things up a little and stop doing the typical thing. Creativity is necessary. Great post by the way

JAKE AWAKE
Guest
JAKE AWAKE
1 year 6 months ago

What a stupid post. It is always WISE to express gratitude.

Michelle
Guest
Michelle
1 year 6 months ago

I stumbled upon you by searching for how to say thank you on Twitter. I only said thank you about 5 times and am already getting on my own nerves. I will have to check out that Commun.it.

Mary
Guest
Mary
1 year 6 months ago

So it’s okay to not thank someone for following as long as I can be authentic and helpful in some type of reply? If I automate my ‘helpful’ content reply, it may still come across as unauthentic. Either way, it’s all very time consuming. Wouldn’t you agree?

Growth Advisor Co
Guest
1 year 9 months ago

Great post. Use my method of scheduling your “thank you tweets” with buffer. Also delete your tweets so they dont mess up your timeline. Also use gifs to break the mundane or the normal tweet.See How to Use Animated GIFs to Improve Your Twitter Marketing Results…
http://growthadvisor.co/how-to-use-animated-gifs-to-improve-your-twitter-marketing-results/

Adrienne
Guest
1 year 10 months ago

Hey Ian,

I finally made it by, sorry it took me so long.

I’d read Mark’s post some time back and I agree with John Paul actually. The people that I’ve built a relationship with and know me for the most part know that I REALLY do appreciate that they shared my content. I’ve always been polite in that way, it’s who I am so to stop saying thank you just doesn’t seem right. I truly am grateful to them and they know it.

Now I interact with them anyway and I share positive quotes as well. I can see what Mark is saying that it can get lost in the crowd because there are so many people on Twitter and a good bit of them aren’t really genuine. But if you’re working toward building relationships with people then this is how this can come in very handy.

For now I’m going to keep it up but I never know what six months from now will bring. I think we each have to do what’s best for us and what works for us. Right now saying thank you still is.

Great share though, thanks.

~Adrienne

Viktor Kovalenko
Guest
2 years 27 days ago

I am glad that I found this article (on the 2nd position in Google search) and found some valuable tips. I am not sure about using Twitter lead generation cards, but I fully agree that automated Thank You replies are not only boring, but look like a spam.

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[…] I’ve really been able to boost the number of people subscribing to my blog and email newsletter since doing this. It’s also a great way of engaging with people and providing more value on Twitter. I included Twitter Lead Generation Cards in my “Thank You Replacement List” in the article Stop Saying Thank You on Social Media & Say Something Meaningful. […]

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[…] Stop Saying Thank You on Social Media & Say Something Meaningful! […]

lindavandevrede
Guest
lindavandevrede
2 years 3 months ago

Just found this post, as you just followed me, and I wanted to thank you. 🙂 Some of us are limited in our ability to scale because of physical limitations, so we do what we can to show appreciation but shy away from platforms that track ALL mentions. It’s too overwhelming for tendonitis, sciatic nerve entrapment, etc. I also tend to shy away from people who have thousands of followers. As you pointed out, the very authenticity of social media is lost in that kind of volume. The people who thrive best on social media are those who don’t have to use voice recognition software, can be online quite a bit vs. judiciously, with no physical limitations that slow them down. Geek desks, Dragon software, outsourcing go only so far. There’s a whole “underground” of people like myself I’ve discovered.

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[…] I’ve really been able to boost the number of people subscribing to my blog and email newsletter since doing this. It’s also a great way of engaging with people and providing more value on Twitter. I included Twitter Lead Generation Cards in my “Thank You Replacement List” in the article Stop Saying Thank You on Social Media & Say Something Meaningful. […]

Marcia Clarke
Guest
2 years 4 months ago

Hi Ian

This is a great article, that I really enjoyed reading. I agree with what you say about the standard show of appreciation, but as you say, many of us are taught to just be polite. I particularly like how you’ve given us ideas and suggestions on how we can try and stand out amongst all the Twitter noise. I will definitely be putting some of these suggestions into practice, and will share with you how I get on. Much appreciated (and trying really hard not to say TY!). 🙂

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[…] blogs and articles I usually read on Sunday – when there is more time! – and discovered this article entitled ‘STOP SAYING THANK YOU ON SOCIAL MEDIA & SAY SOMETHING […]

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